Book Conversation (with Memory Scarlett): The Angel’s Cut

As my good friend Memory said a few months ago: so many wonderful things begin on Twitter. Like reading a book together and then discussing it. Sometimes they continue on Twitter, but this conversation about the sequel to The Vintner’s Luck wouldn’t quite fit there. (It’s over the character limit. Just a tad. A smidge.) After a nice brief break and then life intervention on both our parts, Memory and I finally managed to align our reading schedules enough to do a buddy read of The Angel’s Cut and so we present to you today, the ensuing discussion. Wherein there is much squeeing and pondering of things. And cats. There are also cats.

The Angel's Cut by Elizabeth KnoxThis is part 2 of our conversation, as a note. Part 1 can be found on Memory’s blog here. (If you’d like to see our conversation about The Vintner’s Luck first, you can find part 1 here and part 2 here.)

For those of you who’d like a summary, it is provided below, courtesy of the back cover:

Hollywood, 1929. While Conrad Cole is working late on elaborate plans for his aeroplanes and his films, a mysterious stranger appears at his door. Xas soon finds himself caught up in the glamorous and treacherous world of movie-making and entangled with both Cole and a young woman who owes her life to the eccentric director. Both of them are drawn to Xas without knowing his secret – that under his shirt he hides the remnants of great snowy wings that set him apart from humankind, and that he is destined to wander the earth forever, always hearing the beating of feathers behind him, threatening him that his dark brother has found him again.

The Angel’s Cut will actually stand alone fairly well, so if it sounds like your kind of book, don’t be put off by the fact that it’s a sequel to another book. It will help if you’ve read The Vintner’s Luck because some things will make more immediate sense, but it’s not necessary. I’ll let Memory introduce herself again too:

Hello, Lynn’s readers! I’m Memory, a writer, reader, and watcher of trashy television (and/or movies where lots of stuff blows up). Lynn was one of the first people I met when I jumped into the blogosphere in late 2008, and she’s introduced me to a fair few wonderful books over the years–including THE VINTNER’S LUCK.

And I think that’s it. So with very little further ado… Let’s move on!

!!! REMEMBER! THIS IS PART 2. YOU CAN READ PART 1 HERE. !!!

!!!! HERE BE SPOILERS! THIS IS YOUR SPOILER WARNING! !!!!

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Serial: A Promise Broken, 30

Wherein we have more adult meetings and kerisaoina politics. This features Myrtan once more, so this is your standard reminders that he’s a xenophobic, racist, kerisaoina supremacist and gets to talk in this part. (If you’re wondering why they don’t just chuck him out… Well, you’ll learn why soon enough.)

Yep, I copied this over from last week. And now that you’ve got the whole scene in full. This was one of the hardest scenes to write. I don’t like writing politics, which is obviously why I keep finding myself with stories that have them. But I don’t and I have all the anxiety about how well it actually works. The general dynamics are there, but I’m not sure how well they work for readers.

A Promise Broken is a WIP serial fantasy novel that updates every Monday for free. You can read more about the project here. For every €20 in donations, an additional Wednesday post will be unlocked.

A Promise Broken

Lynn E. O’Connacht

Part 30

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Reading/Watching/Gaming/Etc August 2014

August kind of ran away from me for some reason. But, still, I can’t really complain, as you’ll discover below. The goals post will be up a few days later than normal, just as a heads-up, and the Reading Month will have a final round-up post in the second week of September. (So if you wanted to join in and haven’t yet read a book, I’ve just snuck you in another week and a bit. I won’t tell.)

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Book Talk: Pantomime

PantomimeOut of all the books on my pile, Pantomime is by far the one that I was most scared of reading. Not because I didn’t think the book would be a good match for me, but because I had it in my head that one of my friends absolutely loved this book. I’d be sad to find out that I didn’t at all like a book my friends, or one of them, absolutely adored. It happens rather a lot. I did not, so very much did not, want that to happen with this book. So I put it off until the very end because I’m a scaredycat and I didn’t want to find out that I wasn’t loving a book a friend did yet again.

I needn’t have worried. Pantomine is probably my favourite August read. (It does touch on my pet peeve somewhat, but hey I have reasons for the first person narrative. I can be content.) I still haven’t figured out why I thought one of my friends adored the book, though. Anyway! What’s it about.

R.H. Ragona’s Circus of Magic is the greatest circus of Ellada. Nestled among the glowing blue Penglass – remnants of a mysterious civilisation long gone – are wonders beyond the wildest imagination. It’s a place where anything seems possible, where if you close your eyes you can believe that the magic and knowledge of the vanished Chimeras is still there. It’s a place where anyone can hide.

Iphigenia Laurus, or Gene, the daughter of a noble family, is uncomfortable in corsets and crinoline, and prefers climbing trees to debutante balls. Micah Grey, a runaway living on the streets, joins the circus as an aerialist’s apprentice and soon becomes the circus’s rising star. But Gene and Micah have balancing acts of their own to perform, and a secret in their blood that could unlock the mysteries of Ellada.

Below the cut lie spoilers. Some of them won’t actually be that spoilery in that Lam lays the foundations for them pretty much from the beginning and, as far as I can judge them, does so pretty well. (But I’m cisgendered, so please put the appropriate weight on that comment. I could easily be wrong.)

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Book Talk: Essence

Cover for Essence by Lisa Ann O'KaneWhen I went over all the books I could choose from, Essence is one of the books that I hesitated over because I wasn’t sure whether I was going to like it. It didn’t sound like the things that I usually read, after all, but it sounded quite interesting all the same. I’m glad I gave the book a chance.

Neutrality is the key to longevity.

This motto has governed 16-year-old Autumn’s life in the mid-21st-century Centrist cult, which believes that expressing emotions leads to Essence drain and premature death.

But Autumn’s younger brother’s death casts her faith into question. While sprinting through a park in violation of Centrist teachings, she encounters Ryder Stone, an Outsider who claims Essence drain is nothing more than a Centrist scare tactic. She agrees to join his Community, a utopia of adrenaline junkies living in the abandoned remains of Yosemite National Park.

Autumn learns about sex, drugs, and living life to the fullest. But as she discovers dark secrets beneath the Community’s perfect exterior, she realises that this illusion of paradise could be shattered…

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Reading Month Week 3

Banner for the Strange Chemistry and Exhibit A Reading Month in August, 2014

Can someone tell me what happened to week 2, please? Because I think I kind of missed it. (I honestly have no idea what happened to it. I’m sorry!) I’m tempted to leave the round-up for the end of the month now since I’m already late, but I won’t. I’m a terrible-enough hostess as it is. Instead, I shall show you where I’m at with my pile:

Read

  • Zenn Scarlett by Christian Schoon
  • Playing Tyler by T. L. Costa
  • Stolen Songbird by Danielle Jensen
  • Feather Bound by Sarah Raughley
  • Blackwood by Gwenda Bond
  • Pantomime by Laura Lam
  • Essence by Lisa Ann O’Kane

Still Unread

  • Nada!

Yep. That’s right. I’ve read the lot! Well, almost. There’s actually one I didn’t finish on there. And I got a few more to read later. I won’t be able to read any of them before the end of the month (boo! Why’s it going so fast?), but if you’re curious… Newly aquired (or soon to be acquired) are…

  • Black Dog by Rachel Neumeier
  • Under Nameless Stars by Christian Schoon
  • Shadowplay by Laura Lam

I still want a few more from the backlist, but, um, I’m kind of out of emergency book funds. ^_^;

How about you? Did the second week of the reading month run away from you too? How has it been going so far? Did you get to any of the books you were hoping/planning to get? Did you read something else that was so good it pulled you away from the month? If so, what was it?

If you’ve posted or shared anything related to the reading month, drop a note in the linky provided below or leave a comment! I hope you’ve all been having a lot of fun!



Serial: A Promise Broken, 29

Wherein we have more adult meetings and kerisaoina politics. This features Myrtan once more, so this is your standard reminders that he’s a xenophobic, racist, kerisaoina supremacist and gets to talk in this part. (If you’re wondering why they don’t just chuck him out… Well, you’ll learn why soon enough.)

A Promise Broken is a WIP serial fantasy novel that updates every Monday for free. You can read more about the project here. For every €20 in donations, an additional Wednesday post will be unlocked.

A Promise Broken

Lynn E. O’Connacht

Part 29

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Book Talk: Playing Tyler

Cover for Playing Tyler by T L CostaOut of all the books I picked up for the reading month, I have to admit that this is one I’d pegged most likely to put it down because of a mismatch of taste and interests. You can’t be right all the time, though. (Well. I can’t, anyway.) And this is a case where I am… both right and wrong in equal measures.

Let’s start off with the description because it feels pretty durned long compared to the others I’ve shared so far.

Tyler MacCandless can’t focus, even when he takes his medication. He can’t focus on school, on his future, on a book, on much of anything other than taking care of his older brother, Brandon, who’s in rehab for heroin abuse… again.

Tyler’s dad is dead and his mom has mentally checked out. The only person he can really count on is his Civilian Air Patrol Mentor, Rick. The one thing in life it seems he doesn’t suck at is playing video games and, well, that’s probably not going to get him into college.

Just when it seems like his future is on a collision course with a life sentence at McDonald’s, Rick asks him to test a video game. If his score’s high enough, it could earn him a place in flight school and win him the future he was certain that he could never have. And when he falls in love with the game’s designer, the legendary gamer Ani, Tyler thinks his life might finally be turning around.

That is, until Brandon goes MIA from rehab and Tyler and Ani discover that the game is more than it seems. Now Tyler will have to figure out what’s really going on in time to save his brother… and prevent his own future from going down in flames.

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Serial: A Promise Broken, 28

This still comes with warnings for bullying. I am still very, very sorry. (It also still comes with a note that I’m scared I may have messed up the pronouns somewhere and I’m still trying to figure out the best way to tackle combining what remains of the English case system with the ao pronoun. Thoughts on whether you think the grammar is clear or not would be appreciated greatly. I’ve gone, roughly, with the situation of ‘aos’ for all inflections regardless of case. It works for me, but I have no idea how it works for others.)

Wherein we (finally) get a half-baked explanation why ‘sifanou’ is a bad word and Eiryn does not understand counting. Or numbers, really. Don’t ask her to count to ten. She will mess it up.

A Promise Broken is a WIP serial fantasy novel that updates every Monday for free. You can read more about the project here. For every €20 in donations, an additional Wednesday post will be unlocked.

A Promise Broken

Lynn E. O’Connacht

Part 28

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