Indies and Translations, Should I or Shouldn’t I?

Posted March 29, 2017 by Lynn E. O'Connacht in Miscellaneous / 0 Comments

Tags:

I saw this discussed recently and I thought that, as a multilingual reader with experience with multiple language markets, I thought I’d share my thoughts on the matter.

First things first: The answer is slightly different depending on the market you’re operating in. If you’re looking to translate your works into English, and you can afford a high quality translation, that’s a massive market that’ll be open to you. It’s not just the English-speaking countries that open up to you. It’s all the countries where English is taught as a second language and your native language is not too. So, if you’re thinking of expanding into the English-language market, the answer may well be “Yes, you should”.

When you’re looking at translating into languages, things get murkier and you’ll need to do more research to decide whether it’s worth it for you. Translation isn’t cheap. (Personally, I’d charge about $0.06 per word, which afaik, is still a fair bit below average and means a novelette at exactly 17,500 words would cost you about $1,050 to translate.) Markets vary in size. I can all but guarantee you that paying me to translate your story into Dutch will cost you far more than you’ll recoup. Besides, many Dutch readers are equally happy to read in English, so your book is already available to the majority. If you wanted to translate into Dutch, by all means do, but make sure you have a kick-ass marketing plan and a good reason to do it at a loss before you start because you’ll need them.

In contrast, for example, the Spanish language market is much bigger. You stand a far better chance at recouping your loss and, in my experience, there’s actually a sizeable chunk of that potential market that cannot access your books in English and will not be able to unless you translate it. That up-front investment in translation (and changing the text on your cover) may well recoup itself in time. You’ll still need a marketing plan and you still need to prepare for the chance of a loss, but the chances that you’ll be making a profit are much higher.

You might be better off doing what some authors have done which is pay for the translation out of pocket and shop it around to traditional publishers, using your indie sales to help convince a publisher that they want to publish the book you’ve already translated for them. They won’t be the ones paying extra for the translation since you already paid it, so you’ll stand a better chance of getting your work accepted than if you were shopping the English proposal around.

Whichever way you look at it: venturing into a foreign market is a risk, especially when it’s a market where you don’t speak the language at all and are dependent entirely on other people to tell you what’s going on. You may not want to deal with that aspect at all.

In short, my common sense advice is really: do your research and figure out whether the cost is worth the risk to you. It’s expensive and, depending on the market, there’s no real gain to be had. Ask yourself why you want to translate your book and look into your options. You may be much better served shopping the foreign rights of your book around to traditional publishers.

Well, I hope that was somewhat useful to you! ^_^

Patreon Logo

This post previously appeared on Patreon and is sponsored by generous patrons. Thank you so much for your support! It means the world to me! <3 I love you all!

If you’ve enjoyed this post and would like to support me in creating more free content, please consider subscribing or spreading the word to others. Visit my Patreon page to discover how to get early access to posts as well as various Patron-exclusive posts and goodies!

Divider

Jughead is Aromantic and Asexual. The End.

Posted March 29, 2017 by Lynn E. O'Connacht in Miscellaneous / 0 Comments

Tags:

Thoughts. The text 'rambling thoughts' underneath a burning lantern. For rambles, thoughts, and not-essays.

CW & TW: Discussions of arophobic and acephobic content.

Note #1: Comments are turned off by default on this post for mental health reasons. I’m really sorry to aromantic readers who wanted to comment. If you want to reach out to me via other means, please do!

Note #2: Im not aromantic asexual, but alloromantic demisexual. While I’ve done my best to ensure I’m not accidentally perpetuating arophobia, I cannot be 100% sure I’ve succeeded. Anything in this post/article that perpetuates arophobia is my fault. I apologise for it in advance. In the interest of full disclosure: an aroace friend read this over for me as a sensitivity reader, but any and all issues in this article exist because I messed up.

Note #3: OMG! I am the worst! So so so so many thanks to my friend for reading it over for me. <3 Again, any and all issues in this article are 100% on me, not them. If you think I messed up, blame me and only me. ‘s My doing. Also, please tell me so I can try to address it asap?

Jughead is Aromantic and Asexual. The End.

Firstly, let me start with this: I am not here to discuss whether it’s okay for Riverdale to write Jughead as an alloromantic allosexual (or an alloromantic asexual). It isn’t and this is not up for debate. Let me explain why as briefly as I can.

Jughead may be a fictional character, but there are real people who are aromantic and/or asexual who deeply identify with the way Jughead has been written. For some, Jughead is the only fictional representation of their experiences that they’ve ever seen. For some, it’s the only positive representation they’ve seen that doesn’t imply that they’re broken or inhuman.

If you look through the Twitter hashtag #AroAceJugheadOrBust, you’ll see many aromantic and asexual people discussing their experiences an what Jughead means to them. You’ll see people discussing how good it felt to have words for their experiences and to have anything at all that doesn’t imply that they’re not broken, are human, are normal just like everyone else.

Those who were aware of the Archie comics were aware that Jughead was written in a way that very strongly suggests he is a touch-averse aromantic asexual and has been since the comics began a good 73 years ago. In 2016, Chip Zdarsky, then the writer of the Jughead comics series, confirmed that Jughead is asexual by explicitly using the label on the page in the comic. There is no such explicit confirmation on-page that he’s aromantic, though there are panels where he declares “I am not a romantic person” in front of the whole school and, with the exception of cross-overs or comic alternate universes, he has always been written as someone who doesn’t like to be touched, who isn’t interested in dating or kisses and who thinks that burgers are better than sex.

So can you argue that Jughead is not aromantic? Sure. You can also argue that water is dry, mind you. Even though the comics don’t use the words (except 2016’s use of ‘asexual’) because the coinage of these terms and our understanding of asexuality and aromanticism is fairly recent, the Archie comics offer us 70+ years of behaviour that very strongly implies that Jughead, if given words for his experiences, would describe himself as a touch-averse aromantic asexual.

We frequently use far less evidence to theorise that a character is, say, gay. (Some examples from recent pop culture: Sherlock, Smallville, Supernatural, Merlin. Just to name a few. And, uh, not to open a can of worms here, but in a post about aro and ace erasure, I can’t mention Sherlock Holmes without pointing out that his inclusion here is problematic since he’s widely read as an asexual character.)

Read More

Divider

Book Talk: HEX, Chapter 28

Posted March 27, 2017 by Lynn E. O'Connacht in Books, Other People's Creations / 0 Comments

Tags:

Bilingual read-through of HEX by Thomas Olde Heuvelt

List of Prominent Characters

So, the NL and EN tags are the ones actually used in the story. If it’s listed for both then it’s a shorthand I’m using to note which of the characters is which. Where no name for ‘both’ is included I haven’t used a name for both. (Expect this list to get updated per chapter!)

  • Beek (NL), Black Spring/Black Rock (EN), Black Beek (both)
  • Stefan (NL), Steve (EN), Ste (both)
  • Katherina (NL), Katherine (EN), Kat (both), aka Wylerheks (NL), Black Rock Witch (EN) Wyler Witch (both)
  • Jolanda (NL), Jocelyn (EN), Jo (both)
  • Timo (NL), Tyler (EN), Tiy (both)
  • Oma (NL), Gramma (EN), Granny (both)
  • Max (NL), Matt (EN), Maxmatt (both)
  • Robert Grim (NL, EN)
  • Claire Hamer (NL), Claire Hammer (EN)
  • Jens van der Heijden (NL), Warren Castillo (EN), Jenren (both)
  • Jasmine Aerendonck (NL), Bammy Delarosa (EN), Jasmy (both)
  • The Aerandoncks/The Delarosas, Aerenrosa (both)
  • Martijn Winkel (NL), Marty Keller (EN),Winler (both)
  • Loes Krijgsman (NL), Lucy Everett (EN), Loucy (both)
  • Pieter van Meerten (NL), Pete VanderMeer (EN), Pete van Meer (both)
  • Marieke (NL), Mary (EN), Marie (both)
  • Laurens (NL), Lawrence (EN), Lau (both)
  • Jelmer Holst (NL), Jaydon Holst (EN), Jaymer (both)
  • Mirna (NL), Sue (EN)
  • Burak Sayers (NL), Burak Şayers (EN)
  • Bert Aerendonck (NL), Burt Delarosa (EN)
  • Gemma Holst (NL), Griselda Holst (EN), Gemelda (both)
  • Kobus Mater (NL), Colton Mathers (EN), Colbus (both)
  • Jules Helsloot (NL), Justin Walker (En), Ju (both)

Whoever is born here, is doomed to stay ’til death. Whoever settles, never leaves.

Welcome to Black Spring, the seemingly picturesque Hudson Valley town haunted by the Black Rock Witch, a seventeenth century woman whose eyes and mouth are sewn shut. Muzzled, she walks the streets and enters homes at will. She stands next to children’s bed for nights on end. Everybody knows that her eyes may never be opened or the consequences will be too terrible to bear.

The elders of Black Spring have virtually quarantined the town by using high-tech surveillance to prevent their curse from spreading. Frustrated with being kept in lockdown, the town’s teenagers decide to break their strict regulations and go viral with the haunting. But, in so doing, they send the town spiraling into dark, medieval practices of the distant past.

In chapter 27: Ste continues to handle his favourite son’s death particularly badly. He also learns that Tiy saw… something at night that may or may not have been their resurrected dog and the end result is that Ste begs the Wyler Witch to resurrect his favourite son because he’ll do anything to make that happen.

Read More

Divider

Book Talk: HEX, Chapter 27

Posted March 20, 2017 by Lynn E. O'Connacht in Books, Other People's Creations / 0 Comments

Tags:

Bilingual read-through of HEX by Thomas Olde Heuvelt

List of Prominent Characters

So, the NL and EN tags are the ones actually used in the story. If it’s listed for both then it’s a shorthand I’m using to note which of the characters is which. Where no name for ‘both’ is included I haven’t used a name for both. (Expect this list to get updated per chapter!)

  • Beek (NL), Black Spring/Black Rock (EN), Black Beek (both)
  • Stefan (NL), Steve (EN), Ste (both)
  • Katherina (NL), Katherine (EN), Kat (both), aka Wylerheks (NL), Black Rock Witch (EN) Wyler Witch (both)
  • Jolanda (NL), Jocelyn (EN), Jo (both)
  • Timo (NL), Tyler (EN), Tiy (both)
  • Oma (NL), Gramma (EN), Granny (both)
  • Max (NL), Matt (EN), Maxmatt (both)
  • Robert Grim (NL, EN)
  • Claire Hamer (NL), Claire Hammer (EN)
  • Jens van der Heijden (NL), Warren Castillo (EN), Jenren (both)
  • Jasmine Aerendonck (NL), Bammy Delarosa (EN), Jasmy (both)
  • The Aerandoncks/The Delarosas, Aerenrosa (both)
  • Martijn Winkel (NL), Marty Keller (EN),Winler (both)
  • Loes Krijgsman (NL), Lucy Everett (EN), Loucy (both)
  • Pieter van Meerten (NL), Pete VanderMeer (EN), Pete van Meer (both)
  • Marieke (NL), Mary (EN), Marie (both)
  • Laurens (NL), Lawrence (EN), Lau (both)
  • Jelmer Holst (NL), Jaydon Holst (EN), Jaymer (both)
  • Mirna (NL), Sue (EN)
  • Burak Sayers (NL), Burak Şayers (EN)
  • Bert Aerendonck (NL), Burt Delarosa (EN)
  • Gemma Holst (NL), Griselda Holst (EN), Gemelda (both)
  • Kobus Mater (NL), Colton Mathers (EN), Colbus (both)
  • Jules Helsloot (NL), Justin Walker (En), Ju (both)

Whoever is born here, is doomed to stay ’til death. Whoever settles, never leaves.

Welcome to Black Spring, the seemingly picturesque Hudson Valley town haunted by the Black Rock Witch, a seventeenth century woman whose eyes and mouth are sewn shut. Muzzled, she walks the streets and enters homes at will. She stands next to children’s bed for nights on end. Everybody knows that her eyes may never be opened or the consequences will be too terrible to bear.

The elders of Black Spring have virtually quarantined the town by using high-tech surveillance to prevent their curse from spreading. Frustrated with being kept in lockdown, the town’s teenagers decide to break their strict regulations and go viral with the haunting. But, in so doing, they send the town spiraling into dark, medieval practices of the distant past.

In chapter 26: We briefly get a look at the state of minds of Gemelda and Grim. Also apparently Maxmatt has temporarily woken up to shout a warning and then went back into his comatose/catatonic state.

Read More

Divider

Book Talk: HEX, Chapter 26

Posted March 13, 2017 by Lynn E. O'Connacht in Books, Other People's Creations / 0 Comments

Tags:

Bilingual read-through of HEX by Thomas Olde Heuvelt

List of Prominent Characters

So, the NL and EN tags are the ones actually used in the story. If it’s listed for both then it’s a shorthand I’m using to note which of the characters is which. Where no name for ‘both’ is included I haven’t used a name for both. (Expect this list to get updated per chapter!)

  • Beek (NL), Black Spring/Black Rock (EN), Black Beek (both)
  • Stefan (NL), Steve (EN), Ste (both)
  • Katherina (NL), Katherine (EN), Kat (both), aka Wylerheks (NL), Black Rock Witch (EN) Wyler Witch (both)
  • Jolanda (NL), Jocelyn (EN), Jo (both)
  • Timo (NL), Tyler (EN), Tiy (both)
  • Oma (NL), Gramma (EN), Granny (both)
  • Max (NL), Matt (EN), Maxmatt (both)
  • Robert Grim (NL, EN)
  • Claire Hamer (NL), Claire Hammer (EN)
  • Jens van der Heijden (NL), Warren Castillo (EN), Jenren (both)
  • Jasmine Aerendonck (NL), Bammy Delarosa (EN), Jasmy (both)
  • The Aerandoncks/The Delarosas, Aerenrosa (both)
  • Martijn Winkel (NL), Marty Keller (EN),Winler (both)
  • Loes Krijgsman (NL), Lucy Everett (EN), Loucy (both)
  • Pieter van Meerten (NL), Pete VanderMeer (EN), Pete van Meer (both)
  • Marieke (NL), Mary (EN), Marie (both)
  • Laurens (NL), Lawrence (EN), Lau (both)
  • Jelmer Holst (NL), Jaydon Holst (EN), Jaymer (both)
  • Mirna (NL), Sue (EN)
  • Burak Sayers (NL), Burak Şayers (EN)
  • Bert Aerendonck (NL), Burt Delarosa (EN)
  • Gemma Holst (NL), Griselda Holst (EN), Gemelda (both)
  • Kobus Mater (NL), Colton Mathers (EN), Colbus (both)
  • Jules Helsloot (NL), Justin Walker (En), Ju (both)

Whoever is born here, is doomed to stay ’til death. Whoever settles, never leaves.

Welcome to Black Spring, the seemingly picturesque Hudson Valley town haunted by the Black Rock Witch, a seventeenth century woman whose eyes and mouth are sewn shut. Muzzled, she walks the streets and enters homes at will. She stands next to children’s bed for nights on end. Everybody knows that her eyes may never be opened or the consequences will be too terrible to bear.

The elders of Black Spring have virtually quarantined the town by using high-tech surveillance to prevent their curse from spreading. Frustrated with being kept in lockdown, the town’s teenagers decide to break their strict regulations and go viral with the haunting. But, in so doing, they send the town spiraling into dark, medieval practices of the distant past.

In chapter 25: Maxmatt is now in hospital and there was a funeral service for Tiy. Ste is totally not there for his wife or remaining son because he’s grieving and he hates everyone. Also I really dislike the way the book handles its portrayal of relatives and loved ones of someone who committed suicide.

Read More

Divider

Kindness of Teachers

Posted March 9, 2017 by Lynn E. O'Connacht in Miscellaneous / 0 Comments

Tags:

Somewhere in the grand list of Things Lynn Is Grateful For, I always find myself going back to primary school. Primary school was… not a good time for me. I think there was about one year in which I didn’t get bullied.

I don’t recall if I’ve written about that before, but anyway this is not a post about bullying. I’m just mentioning it because the mindset is important. I went from being a social introvert who loved storytelling and sharing to a wallflower quite quickly.

I wasn’t just a wallflower, though. I became a ‘trouble-maker’. I didn’t like being in classrooms at all. They were loud and, you know, the kids who bullied me were there and I was expected to cooperate with them on things. And mostly I blanked out this part of my life as much as possible, but the main point is this: instead of addressing the fact that I was bullied and getting the other kids to behave they labelled me as a trouble-maker because I get disrupting the class.

They started removing me from the classroom. Which meant I acted out worse because, look, that was what I wanted. (Okay, so the thing I wanted was for things to be quiet and more challenging and for the bullying to not-happen, but since that was the functional result of being moved into the teachers’ lounge…)

My point is that during most of my formative years I was told by teachers that I wasn’t worth anything. They may not have meant to, but that was what happened when they didn’t address the issues I was having and only looked at the surface. My self-worth, already having taken a beating from repeated bullying, plummeted further.

And then, when I was… nine, I think, a new teacher started to work at our school. He wasn’t my teacher (yet), but he was… I’m not sure if he was new and still filled with the energy of a newly graduated teacher, full of ideals. Probably that’s just the kind of person he was.

But the point is that he saw us. He saw me. And he didn’t see a child that was just making trouble for the sake of making trouble. Or whatever the teachers before him thought I was doing. No, he saw a child worth encouraging. He taught me that I was worth something. That I mattered.

And sure it didn’t stop the bullying, but his belief in me was something that I sorely needed.

In secondary school things were somewhat better. At least in the sense that I had teachers who believed in me and who encouraged me to keep up my studies and attend university. (It’s not that I hated school. I like school and learning. Yes, I’m weird. Deal with it? It’s just I hated the bullying and I hated being bored by the classes.) And so I found myself at university after all.

All because one teacher in primary school decided to look past the label of trouble-maker and saw a child who just needed encouragement and someone with an authority position to say “I believe in you”.

Divider

Book Talk: HEX, Chapter 25

Posted March 6, 2017 by Lynn E. O'Connacht in Books, Other People's Creations / 0 Comments

Tags:

Bilingual read-through of HEX by Thomas Olde Heuvelt

List of Prominent Characters

So, the NL and EN tags are the ones actually used in the story. If it’s listed for both then it’s a shorthand I’m using to note which of the characters is which. Where no name for ‘both’ is included I haven’t used a name for both. (Expect this list to get updated per chapter!)

  • Beek (NL), Black Spring/Black Rock (EN), Black Beek (both)
  • Stefan (NL), Steve (EN), Ste (both)
  • Katherina (NL), Katherine (EN), Kat (both), aka Wylerheks (NL), Black Rock Witch (EN) Wyler Witch (both)
  • Jolanda (NL), Jocelyn (EN), Jo (both)
  • Timo (NL), Tyler (EN), Tiy (both)
  • Oma (NL), Gramma (EN), Granny (both)
  • Max (NL), Matt (EN), Maxmatt (both)
  • Robert Grim (NL, EN)
  • Claire Hamer (NL), Claire Hammer (EN)
  • Jens van der Heijden (NL), Warren Castillo (EN), Jenren (both)
  • Jasmine Aerendonck (NL), Bammy Delarosa (EN), Jasmy (both)
  • The Aerandoncks/The Delarosas, Aerenrosa (both)
  • Martijn Winkel (NL), Marty Keller (EN),Winler (both)
  • Loes Krijgsman (NL), Lucy Everett (EN), Loucy (both)
  • Pieter van Meerten (NL), Pete VanderMeer (EN), Pete van Meer (both)
  • Marieke (NL), Mary (EN), Marie (both)
  • Laurens (NL), Lawrence (EN), Lau (both)
  • Jelmer Holst (NL), Jaydon Holst (EN), Jaymer (both)
  • Mirna (NL), Sue (EN)
  • Burak Sayers (NL), Burak Şayers (EN)
  • Bert Aerendonck (NL), Burt Delarosa (EN)
  • Gemma Holst (NL), Griselda Holst (EN), Gemelda (both)
  • Kobus Mater (NL), Colton Mathers (EN), Colbus (both)
  • Jules Helsloot (NL), Justin Walker (En), Ju (both)

Whoever is born here, is doomed to stay ’til death. Whoever settles, never leaves.

Welcome to Black Spring, the seemingly picturesque Hudson Valley town haunted by the Black Rock Witch, a seventeenth century woman whose eyes and mouth are sewn shut. Muzzled, she walks the streets and enters homes at will. She stands next to children’s bed for nights on end. Everybody knows that her eyes may never be opened or the consequences will be too terrible to bear.

The elders of Black Spring have virtually quarantined the town by using high-tech surveillance to prevent their curse from spreading. Frustrated with being kept in lockdown, the town’s teenagers decide to break their strict regulations and go viral with the haunting. But, in so doing, they send the town spiraling into dark, medieval practices of the distant past.

In chapter 24: We see the effect that recent events have on Grim and the way the Wyler Witch has suddenly changed her patterns and Grim is wondering what could possibly drive Tiy to this, but is not at all thinking about the fact that there’s at least three people in the town who have very good reasons to hate Tiy.

Read More

Divider

Culture Consumption February 2017

Posted March 2, 2017 by Lynn E. O'Connacht in Miscellaneous / 0 Comments

Tags:

February was a month filled with trying to settle into a new job and a different country and, well, basically it didn’t go well because I sadly wasn’t very suited to it. T_T So now we’re back to square one. Yay? Anyway, February was filled with a few changes, not least of which that most all my posts will be available earlier on Patreon and, as a result of all the upheaval in my life the past month post numbers are accordingly down. This will continue for the foreseeable future.

What I've Posted

You must fill out the year/date in your wrap-up shortcode.

What I've Read

Always Be You by RoAnna Sylver: This is such a sweet short story about consent between two ace-spec characters! It builds on the characters introduced in RoAnna’s Chameleon Moon, but you don’t have to read it to get a lot out of this story. I mean, it will make the emotional charge of the story much more impactful because you’ll already know the characters, but its focus on a single moment in their relationship means that you don’t need to to follow along. And it is so sweet and lovely and you should just go and read it because words. What are.

Choosing You by Jaylee James: This is a brief time-traveller romance, of a sort, which has a bittersweet ending, given all that it says about free will and the choices we make. It didn’t at all end the way that I thought it would, which was a great surprise. I liked it a lot, even though it didn’t quite give me the answers that I was hoping to get. (The story’s not geared to providing them, though, to be fair.)

Eight Days of Luke by Diana Wynne Jones: This was so much fun! I’m slowly reading through all the Diana Wynne Jones books I missed out on as a child (boo!) and this was the one that I found/bought/picked up next after a long drought. I had a lot of fun trying to piece the story together and I loved how layered it is and how much it lends itself to rereading. There’s a good three different main storyline experiences in this, depending on the knowledge you have going into it, and it’s glorious. I really wish I’d read this as a child and could have had the experience of being introduced to Norse mythology through this book.

Hello World by Tiffany Rose and Alexandra Tauber: This was so cool! I need to write up a proper post for it, but basically: asexual misanthropist hacker adopts a not-actually-AI by accident and also ends up making the world a better place sort-of by accident in a near-future world. I wish some of the book’s concept had been a little more detailed (I still don’t quite know as much as I’d like about HIDs) and I wished it’d avoided my pet peeve of not giving the reader information the characters clearly have, but overall I gobbled this up. I loved Scott and Sonia and the way their relationship developed, as well as their personalities. They were awesome.

HEX by Thomas Olde Heuvelt: My thoughts on this are still going up chapter by chapter, so all I’ll say is that I’m delighted to finally be done with it!

Lies We Tell Ourselves by Robin Talley: I really appreciated the amount of research Talley put into the book and the distinct voices between the narrators, but ultimately I don’t have any idea what Sarah saw in Linda and I wasn’t comfortable with the romance. Linda is incredibly racist and I don’t know that she changed enough for me to be comfortable with the power dynamics in their relationship.

Radio Silence by Alice Oseman: My thoughts can be read here. In short, while I did really enjoy this, my enjoyment was hampered by two things: the fact that my expectations were wildly different from the story I got and the fact that the way the narrative introduces Aled’s demisexuality (or just treats him in general) bothers me immensely.

The Ransom of Dond by Siobhan Dowd: This is a short MG illustrated novella. I hesitate to call it sweet, since it deals with some pretty heavy topics, but… I thought the way the siblings meet and bond was so sweet. I really enjoyed it and I’m glad I picked it up.

Redshirts by John Scalzi: I am… of two minds about this.  I’m not sure I feel that Scalzi quite pulled off the narrative-in-a-narrative-in-a-narrative meta commentary for me, but I did quite enjot the ride and the characters. I had a lot of fun with this. I wanted to read a chapter to see how I’d like it and stayed up late to finish it.

Rift Riders by Becca Lusher: Now I have to wait until the 17th for book 3! T_T This is very different in tone to the first book, but if you’ve enjoyed the world and the characters, you’ll probably enjoy the change of pace. Just be warned that when I say “change of pace”, I mean “this book is not ‘high adventurer is stuck in fantasy Regency-romancelandia and must escape to her true calling’ but ‘Becca, this death toll and level of world-stage tragedy usually happens prior to book 1 or like somewhere around book 4, stop killing everyone, please at least LEAVE THE DOGS ALONE OKAY'” so just… be warned of that. It is a thing.

Sky and Dew by Holly Heisey: This is a short story that I’ve been meaning to read for… ages now. I finally did! I’d forgotten what it was about, but I really enjoyed the way it was written and the world-building. Again, I’d have liked to see a little more of it, but it wouldn’t have suited this story.

Wintersong by S. Jae Jones: I picked this up because I kept seeing it discussed as heavily inspired by Labyrinth, one of my favourite films ever, and… It is. Very much so. Which means that I actually found parts of the book jarring with the way they called back to the film. It’s also very, very different and I enjoyed reading a lot until… right up the end, which was unsatisfying to the extreme. I’ve since seen Jones talk about a sequel on Twitter, so I’m hoping that there really will be one. I’d have been fine with the ending if the book had been advertised to me as the first in a series/duology. Anyway, if you enjoyed Labyrinth, there’s a good chance you’ll enjoy this, especially if you like your Western-European-based fantasy to draw on the folklore rather than Victorian-era sanitisation. (Yes, I know. It’s Germanic folklore, but the timeframe is the same.)

What I'm Reading

Bog Child by Siobhan Dowd: I think I’m only a chapter or so into this! So I don’t really have too much to say, except that it seems to be shaping up into a story I’ll enjoy a lot.

City of Strife by Claudie Arseneault: I’m such a slow reader! I’m sorry, Claudie! T_T But this is otherwise absolutely glorious so far. It’s epic fantasy political intrigue featuring loads of ace-spec and aro-spec main characters. I was a little thrown in the earlier chapters because I wasn’t expecting halflings – I’ll forever associate them with D&D – but I’ve adjusted now. I’m really curious to see how the story is going to be shaping up. I love the characters so far. (Well, most of them. There’s a couple of mages I’m not fond of.) Really need to read more. 😀

What I've Played

Torment: Tides of Numenera: Ah, cRPGs. How I love them. This one is a spiritual successor to Planescape Torment, which I’ve never finished. This one sucked me in and kept me up way too late so far. I’m really enjoying it. I hope I’m not anywhere near the end yet, though.

What I've Watched

Nope. I’ve been without a tv for the whole month, so… Nothing. It was glorious!

Divider

Upcoming Plans March 2017

Posted March 1, 2017 by Lynn E. O'Connacht in Goals / 2 Comments

Tags:

This Month's Goals

I Want to Read:

  • Books!

I Want to Write:

  • Words!

Yes, that’s not actually very descriptive, I know. I would apologise, but I’m not actually sorry. This month will see me return to school! Well, to a Coursera course, actually, but it’ll be with the express intent to learn and start working towards a career change. This’ll start off as just a refresher to get used to long-distance learning and to get a general idea of how I feel about formally studying the field and we’ll see how it goes after that. I’ll also be looking at job applications (again) and setting up and prepping Patreon for more intense changes and a return to what I’d originally envisioned.

I’d also kind of like to find the time to revisit my existing books and experiment with ways to add trigger warnings. In print, it strikes me as easy enough to cover, but ebooks have always given me a spot of trouble.

So I’m planning to do quite a few behind-the-scenes things! And we’ll see how it all goes. I do aim to get at least one book read (for the AceBookClub!) and to work on DemiPrincess again, though. Small steps. Small progress. But progress all the same.

Divider

Goal Review February 2017

Posted March 1, 2017 by Lynn E. O'Connacht in Goals / 0 Comments

Tags:

Last Month's Goal

I Want to Read:

  • Whatever strikes my fancy

I Want to Write:

  • Anything I can

Well, February certainly followed the “I’m a little busy moving” theme, considering it involved moving twice. I am very exhausted and didn’t get around to posting this in February. Actually, I’m lucky to remember at all. The final weekend of the month was absolutely filled with speaking up about ace and aro erasure and at least attempting to help friends deal with aphobes. It was also filled with, you know, moving and settling and getting life things sorted out.

The sorting is in progress, but I should have more brain capacity to devote to everything I want to accomplish soon. Which is all for another post. This is about what I did in February. What I did in February was, very simply, finish reading HEX by Thomas Olde Heuvelt and finish writing up the posts for the read-through. They are now all done. WHOOT!

That’s a novella’s worth of commentary, I think, since the final third was 10K. OMG! And also OMG! I FINISHED! *happy dance. throws confetti. happy dance. exciting bouncing* You’ve all seen me struggle with it and you may have remembered that I was superclose to giving up entirely at some points and… I didn’t. I persevered. I’m so ridiculously happy about that.

That’s, um, also all the writing that I managed to do this month. Instead, I spent a good chunk of my time reading. (Or, uh, sleeping. Mostly it was sleeping.) But hey I got a nice chunk of books read! YAY! Now I just still need to write reviews for them because I’m hopeless at that too right now.

Divider